Challenges

Your design practice plays an essential role in increasing orga­ni­sational creativity. The performance of your practice is crucial to over­come challenges from your business and in your orga­ni­sation. The better the performance, the better can your practice address these challenges.

Challenges

Challenges from your business

Your design practice is challenged to meet and exceed ever-increasing expectations of your business. For example:

  • Deliver excellent designs faster
    There is a constant pressure to design faster. How can your practice speed up design and maintain high quality?
  • Handle increasing complexity of design
    Technological advances, particularly in IT, make almost all artefacts inevitably more complex (e.g., see Learning to live with complexity). How can your practice learn to live well with complexity?
  • Promote cross-disciplinary design
    Boundaries and definitions of design are blurring. How can your practice embrace interdisciplinarity?

Challenges in your organisation

Your design practice is challenged to flourish in your organisation. For example:

  • Demon­strate the value of design
    Everything that an organisation does is a product of imagination. How can your practice show that design matters?
  • Build a design culture
    The way people think and act affects the way they create (e.g., see How cultural characteristics influence design processes). How can your practice help others embrace design thinking?
  • Attract and retain design talent
    Great design requires great designers. How can your practice constantly motivate design talent?

Gains

Building a creative orga­ni­sation may bring the following gains to your design practice:

  • Excited customers
  • Wide customer base
  • Strong design team
  • Nimble design processes
  • Acknowledged value of design

Pains

Building a creative orga­ni­sation may relieve your design practice from the following pains:

  • Non-returning customers
  • Dependency on individual designers
  • High turnover of designers
  • Chaotic design processes
  • Continual fight for attention